Indigenous Rangers celebrated on World Ranger Day

31 July 2021
  • On World Ranger Day Australia celebrates the contribution Indigenous Rangers make in protecting Australia from exotic pests and diseases.
  • Northern Australia poses one of the highest natural risk pathways.

On World Ranger Day we are celebrating the significant contribution our Indigenous Rangers make in protecting Australia from exotic pests and diseases.

Minister for Agriculture and Northern Australia, David Littleproud said the expert knowledge of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Rangers about Country plays a critical role in Australia’s national biosecurity system

“Northern Australia poses a high-risk pathway for exotic pests and diseases that threaten our agriculture, our export markets and our environment,” Minister Littleproud said.

“Australia’s First Nation peoples, including Indigenous Ranger groups have made important contributions to the Northern Australia Quarantine Strategy initiative since its inception in 1989.

“The rangers help provide early surveillance and detection of emerging biosecurity threats across the north that protects the nation’s $66 billion agricultural industries and our communities.

“They undertake aquatic, animal and plant health surveillance, insect trapping, plant host mapping and community-based biosecurity engagement and awareness.

“The Australian Government is investing over $7 million this year to create opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders in biosecurity activities and capability building initiatives.

“We thank our Indigenous Rangers for their work to protect our status as a nation free from many of the world’s most destructive pests and diseases.”

Fast Facts:

  • In 2021-22, 64 ranger groups are delivering biosecurity surveillance activities and have over 900 biosecurity surveillance activities scheduled.
  • Since 2016 the Australian Government has invested around $19.5 million providing opportunities relating to biosecurity for our Indigenous Rangers.
  • The groups are mainly located along the northern Australian coastline, with a focus on high-risk pathways with a potential for pest and disease incursions.